The influence of inferred traffic safety culture on traffic safety performance in USA States (1994–2014)

dc.contributor.authorBenzaman, Ben
dc.contributor.authorWard, Nicholas John
dc.contributor.authorSchell, William
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-29T19:31:36Z
dc.date.available2022-09-29T19:31:36Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.description© This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Traffic safety performance (crash fatalities per billion vehicle miles traveled) is influenced by many factors related to the physical and social environment. The traffic safety culture in the local environment can influence behaviors that influence the risk of a fatal crash. However, if traffic safety culture is defined as “shared beliefs,” it is not possible to directly observe the effect of culture on traffic safety performance. Method: This study replicated the method proposed by Page (2001) to infer the effect of traffic safety culture on traffic safety performance for U.S. states between 1994 and 2014. This method infers the influence of traffic safety culture from the error between actual and predicted performance based on observable variables that measure the physical and social environment as well as behavioral hazards. Results: The results suggest that a positive traffic safety culture can have a protective effect by producing a lower-than-expected fatality rate. Conversely, a negative traffic safety culture can have an exacerbating effect by producing a larger-than-expected fatality rate. Conclusion: The derived metric for estimating traffic safety culture had strong concurrent validity by correlating with the ranking of states based only on total crash fatality rate. Practical Implications: Consistent with Page (2001), the analysis also identified common risk factors across states including per capita alcohol consumption and unemployment rate.en_US
dc.identifier.citationBenzaman, B., Ward, N. J., & Schell, W. J. (2022). The influence of inferred traffic safety culture on traffic safety performance in US States (1994–2014). Journal of safety research, 80, 311-319.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-4375
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/handle/1/17251
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.rightscc-by-nc-nden_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjecttraffic safety cultureen_US
dc.subjecttraffic safetyen_US
dc.subjectmodelingen_US
dc.titleThe influence of inferred traffic safety culture on traffic safety performance in USA States (1994–2014)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage1en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage9en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Safety Researchen_US
mus.citation.volume80en_US
mus.data.thumbpage3en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsr.2021.12.014en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.departmentMechanical & Industrial Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US

Files

Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
benzaman-traffic-2021.pdf
Size:
754.56 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
traffic safety
License bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
826 B
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description:
Copyright (c) 2002-2022, LYRASIS. All rights reserved.