MSU Extension - Publications

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    Bystander intervention to prevent firearm injury: A qualitative study of 4‐H shooting sports participants
    (Wiley, 2023-05) Trinka, Teresa; Oesterle, Daniel W.; Silverman, Amira C.; Vriniotis, Mary G.; Orchowski, Lindsay M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Betz, Marian E.; Hudson, Craven; Kesner, Todd; Ranney, Megan L.
    This qualitative study examines how youth and adult members of 4-H Shooting Sports clubs perceive firearm injury risk and risk reduction, and the applicability of a bystander intervention (BI) risk reduction framework in this community. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 youth and 13 adult members of 4-H Shooting Sports clubs across nine US states from March to December of 2021 until thematic saturation was reached. Deductive and inductive thematic qualitative analyses were performed. Six overarching themes emerged: (1) The tendency to view firearm injury as predominantly unintentional in nature; (2) Acknowledgment of a wide array of risks for firearm injury; (3) Perceived barriers to bystander action to prevent firearm injury including knowledge, confidence, and consequences of action; (4) Facilitators of bystander action including a sense of civic responsibility; (5) Direct and indirect strategies to address potential risks for firearm injury; and (6) Belief that BI skills training would be useful for 4-H Shooting Sports. Findings lay the groundwork for applying BI skills training as an approach to firearm injury prevention in 4-H Shooting Sports, similar to how BI has been applied to other types of injury (i.e., sexual assault). 4-H Shooting Sports club members' sense of civic responsibility is a key facilitator. Prevention efforts should attend to the broad array of ways in which firearm injury occurs, including suicide, mass shootings, homicide, and intimate partner violence, as well as unintentional injury.
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    Genetic Engineering and Risk in the Varietal Selection of Potatoes
    (2018-02) Fuller, Kate B.; Brester, Gary W.; Boland, Michael A.
    The objective of this case study is to examine the farm management decision of whether to adopt a new, genetically engineered potato variety. We describe the potato supply chain from seed production to final consumer products and explore how price and production risk interact to influence decision making at each link in that chain. We provide extensive supplemental material as well, including a teaching note with assignment and/or discussion questions, an introduction to and application of stakeholder theory, and a tool that assists students in calculating expected and simulated actual returns from their choice of potato variety.
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    Montana Horizons Program: Transforming Communities from Striving to Thriving
    (MSU Extension: Local Government Center, 2009) Lachapelle, Paul; Flaherty, C.
    This report has descriptions of the sixteen communities stretching from Scobey to Anaconda. These sixteen communities successfully completed the Horizons II program during 2007-08 which provide just a small example of their achievements. The smallest town had 139 residents, the largest, 4,089. Poverty rates ranged from 11% to 41%. As examples throughout this report attest, the challenges in rural communities are significant but not insurmountable and opportunities abound. When community members focus on a specific outcome, join hands with collaborating partners and keep their eye on the future, the possibilities are never-ending. A new spirit and passion for community involvement is created when a common goal is identified and shared broadly.
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    Using Focus Groups for Community Development. MSU Extension MontGuide
    (MSU Extension, 2008-05) Lachapelle, Paul; Mastel, Tara
    Focus groups can be an effective means of involving citizens in a decision-making process. Yet, focus groups can also increase conflict and strain group dynamics if not properly executed. This publication provides information on the reasons to use a focus group, the steps involved, the types of questions that could be posed and expected outcomes.
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    Montana Horizons Program: Transforming Communities from Striving to Thriving
    (MSU Extension: Local Government Center, 2010) Lachapelle, Paul; Graham, B
    This report details the work accomplished by 15 communities that successfully completed the Horizons III program during 2008-10 and provides a snapshot of their achievements. As examples throughout this report attest, the challenges in rural communities are significant but not insurmountable and opportunities abound. When community members focus on a specific outcome, join hands with collaborating partners and keep their eye on the future, the possibilities are never-ending. A new spirit and passion for community involvement is created when a common goal is identified and shared broadly.
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    City of Bozeman Ethics Handbook
    (MSU Extension: Local Government Center, 2010) Lachapelle, Paul
    This ethics handbook is produced by the city of Bozeman Board of ethics to educate citizens and train employees and public officials in best practices and legal requirements. In addition, this handbook details specific ethical requirements and provides guidance on obtaining information and filing complaints. The City Code of Ethics provides legal requirements outlining conduct and best practices as detailed in Chapter 2.01 of the Bozeman Municipal Code.
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    Montana Policy Review
    (MSU Extension: Local Government Center, 2011-09) Multiple Authors; Lachapelle, Paul; Lachapelle, Paul; Costakis, Cathy; Clark, Dan
    The Fall 2011 issue titled Community Resiliency and the Built Environment: Innovations and Policy Issues in Montana focuses on how the built environment influences quality of life and economic prosperity across Montana. The built environment refers to the human-made physical structures and supporting infrastructure that provide the setting for human activity. In Montana, these surroundings shape our economic, social, environmental, and public health outcomes. The articles provide the most complete analysis to date of built environment initiatives from the people who have designed, developed, and delivered the programs and plans.
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    Montana Policy Review
    (MSU Extension: Local Government Center, 2011-03) Multiple Authors; Lachapelle, Paul; Lachapelle, Paul; Clark, Dan
    The Spring 2011 special issue titled "Montana Horizons: Program Outcomes and Policy Implications" focuses on an on-going community leadership program aimed at reducing poverty in rural communities experiencing significant decline or demographic change. The articles describe Horizons from the people who coordinated or actively participated in the program. With personal insights and professional learning and wisdom, the stories, narratives, and academic articles provide the most complete analysis to date of this program from the people who delivered it; a program that many will attribute to wide-spread and positive community change.
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    Citizen Participation and Interaction
    (MSU Extension: Local Government Center, 2010) Lachapelle, Paul
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    Strategic Visioning for Community Development. MSU Extension MontGuide
    (MSU Extension, 2011) Lachapelle, Paul; Anderson, Katelyn; Wedum, Wendy
    Strategic visioning is used by communities to identify future goals and work collectively to address community development needs. This guide provides an overview of the benefits of strategic visioning, situations appropriate to apply the techniques, and the steps to plan, implement and evaluate a visioning process.
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    Apsaalooke Upsauloouk Bucha Unnaylayda - Crow Men's Health
    (MSU Extension, 2009) Lachapelle, Paul; Real Bird, James
    Whether they talk about it or not, health is a very important part of all Crow mens' lives. A modern lifestyle of fast-food and little exercise has put this health in jeopardy. In this video, Crow men talk about their feeling on health and the Crow Men's Health Ride. The 2008 ride to Sacrifice Cliff/Four Dances Vision Site acknowledged the importance of health and recognized the young Crow men who gave their lives to save the tribe from smallpox.
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    Community Strategic Visioning as a Method to Address Poverty: An Analysis from Select Rural Montana Communities
    (Extension Journal, Inc., 2010) Lachapelle, Paul; Austin, Eric; Clark, D.
    Community strategic visioning is a citizen-based planning process in which diverse sectors of a community collectively determine a future state and coordinate a plan of action. Twenty-one communities in rural Montana participated in a multi-phase poverty reduction program that culminated in a community strategic vision process. Research on this process was guided by alternative definitions of poverty and place attachment literature. Results from the qualitative survey data show many descriptions of poverty outside of traditional economic definitions and illustrations on the significance of place. Implications and recommendations on the use of visioning in other contexts in Extension are discussed.
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